E THEME BY EXCOLO
Where I will spew my thoughts on fashion, my fandoms, life,my latest obsession and everything else that catches my attention
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winterlive:

ellidfics:

The unsung heroes.

That was one of the most horrifying, painful, beautiful parts of the movie.  So many of them weren’t prepared, so many were administrators who had no clue that the STRIKE teams had turned, let alone that a killing machine like the Winter Soldier was on the loose.  

So many of them died.

And yet none of them hesitated.  Despite the propaganda Pierce had unleashed, despite their orders, despite everything, they still responded.  Their sacrifice, their heroism - they gave the last full measure of devotion, and I can’t imagine that Steve wouldn’t attend the memorial service, even if he had to use a wheelchair or a cane because his own wounds hadn’t finished healing.

"Captain’s orders" indeed.

without these people, there IS no Captain America.

Tagged with: #*ugly sobbing*  #captain america  

emilianadarling:

likeadisguise:

Pre-serum, Steve Rogers was COLOR BLIND. He literally opened his eyes to a whole different world.

My mind is totally blown by this.

Oh god, though. Imagine Steve Rogers, artist and art enthusiast, opening his eyes and seeing the world in a full range of colours for the first time.

Steve Rogers experimenting with coloured pencils a few days after the procedure and having a silently hysterical moment over how many different colours there are.  

Steve Rogers finding time to sneak off to the National Gallery/National Portrait Gallery/V&A while he’s on shore leave in London and just staring at the classic paintings he spent years of his life studying, but now they’re bright and vibrant and the reds are so red and it’s all so different from the versions that exist inside his memories.

STEVE ROGERS REDISCOVERING HOW MUCH HE LOVES ART AGAIN NOW THAT HE CAN APPRECIATE IT IN A WHOLE NEW WAY.

ARTIST STEVE ROGERS.

branstarked:

spuzz:

I want a story about Brooklyn residents and their POV after Steve moves back and is an Avenger and fighting and then coming home to Brooklyn and everyone simultaneously unphased and blasé but also alternately super protective and proud of their hometown hero.

And like Steve is just there and he’s a neighbor and a helper and a participant in block parties and spaghetti dinner fundraisers and checks in on the elderly and carries boxes and furniture for people and helps with neighborhood watch and teaches self defense classes and speaks at the schools.

And when he’s fighting and the fighting comes to Brooklyn or people are targeting Cap and everyone is like out on the street with baseball bats and yelling and being super protective and Steve is just like what are you doing are you out of your minds go back into your homes and stay safe and the people of Brooklyn are like fuck no, we are going to help you whether you like it or not. This is our home and you’re OUR kid. Brooklyn born and bred, that shit doesn’t leave you. And you’re not leaving US again.

       

Tagged with: #Captain America  #Steve Rogers  

ifeelbetterer:

miwrighting:

kototyph:

leupagus:

killerville:

   

WOOED THE WORD YOU’RE LOOKING FOR IS WOOED

GUESS WHOSE TAGS ARE TOTALLY GETTING REBLOGGED

Star-struck Interviewer: “You must miss the good old days.”

Steve Rogers: “I grew up in a tenement slum. Rats, lice, bedbugs, one shared bathroom per floor with a bucket of water to flush, cast iron coal-burning stove for cooking and heat. Oh, and coal deliveries - and milk deliveries, if you could get it - were by horse-drawn cart. One summer I saw a workhorse collapse in the heat, and the driver started beating it with a stick to make it get up. We threw bricks at the guy until he ran away. Me and Bucky and our friends used to steal potatoes or apples from the shops. We’d stick them in tin cans with some hot ashes, tie the cans to some twine, and then swing ‘em around as long as we could to get the ashes really hot. Then we’d eat the potato. And there were the block fights. You don’t know what a block fight was? That’s when the Irish or German kids who lived on one block and the Jewish or Russian kids who lived on the next block would all get together into one big mob of ethnic violence and beat the crap out of each other. One time I tore a post out of a fence and used it on a Dutch kid who’d called Bucky a Mick. Smacked him in the head with the nails.”

Interviewer: “LET’S TALK ABOUT THE INTERNET.”

Steve Rogers: “I love cat pictures.”

(Many biographical details are taken from Streetwise, either from Jack Kirby’s autobiographical story or Nick Cardy’s contribution: http://twomorrows.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=52&products_id=513 )

it got better

Tagged with: #Captain America  #Steve Rogers  #my bb  

blackestglass:

actualmenacebuckybarnes:

during the war, someone comes back from the mail truck with, like, a bucketful of fan letters for captain america

the howling commandos all jibe him, bucky complaining loudly about how there’s nothing for him, not even a stray love letter or two?? (but of course he’s proud as hell for his boy)

at first steve is overwhelmed, but then he gets super serious about it, reading every one and sitting at the table where they plan raids on hydra bases and drafting letters back:

Dear Suzie,

Thank you for your kind and thoughtful letter. It is a great honor for myself and my men to be featured in your prayers for a safe return. Unfortunately, I have not had the opportunity to meet your brother, Sgt. Donovan. I have not met any man from the 58th infantry, but I hear that they are good, brave soldiers …

then phillips finds out and he’s like, of course we can’t send those out, it would compromise our position, or do you not understand the concept of a super secret mission

and steve just kind of looks sad in that kicked puppy way and peggy is so touched she gathers up all the letters he’s written and tells him she’ll find a way, every one of these kids is going to get their letter from captain america come hell or high water

(70-odd years later, suzie donovan, married name suzie moore donates a carefully-preserved letter to the smithsonian exhibit on captain america

it’s encased under glass, next to letters from three other children. the panel reads: steve rogers, a good soldier, a good man

steve sees this the first time he comes to the exhibit, spends twenty minutes reading his own painstakingly tidy handwriting in each word of each letter and thinks, oh peggy)

I AM SO INCREDIBLY NOT OKAY RIGHT NOW

acederek:

i mad that in the “steve discovers pop culture” posts nobody mentions him losing his shit over animation like homie’s an artist and probably saw snow white as many times as he could. imagine him seeing Ariel’s hair float around in the little mermaid or all the weird partial 3D in Aladdin

and tony’s in the corner like “but sci fi and visual effects” and steve’s like shhh i’m trying to watch the hunchback of notre dame”

Tagged with: #Captain America  #Steve Rogers  

quigonejinn:

yesmissmori:

bedlamsbard:

justatinysootsprite:

What, are we taking everybody?

the reason that this line is significant is because jim morita was a japanese-american soldier. while it’s never explicitly stated, here’s what morita’s life would have been like before being captured by HYDRA:

  • december 7, 1942:  the empire of japan attacked pearl harbor. he was probably a soldier at this time since he was considered to be elite enough for steve’s squad; unknown where he served, although there were many japanese-american soldiers who died in and who were the first responders to the attack.
  • december 8, 1942:  the us declares a state of war with japan.
  • all japanese-american men disqualified from the draft via the label “4-C,” or “enemy alien,” no matter their citizenry. all japanese-american men in the service are removed from duty.
  • february 19, 1942:  president roosevelt signed executive order 9066, authorizing the military to exclude certain groups from military zones.
  • the fbi searched the homes of japanese-americans for “contraband,” including correspondence with anyone in japan such as personal letters. any such contraband is confiscated.
  • (fun sidenote:  how did they know where to find these people so that they could be harassed? well, gosh, the census bureau told them. illegally. no big deal.)
  • community leaders, including priests, gathered up and sent to prison camps like tule lake. this is also where several families were sent to be deported to japan since they were not deemed loyal enough.
  • 122,000 people of japanese-american descent are told to sell or store their property as they can only bring what they can carry out of the “exclusion zones,” which meant most of the west coast. (hawaii, whose population was about a quarter japanese, was for the most part not included in this.) given only a few weeks to organize their lives, they were then sent via cattle train to concentration camps set up throughout the us.
  • since morita was from fresno, he would have ended up here:
    charming.
  • sunny poston, arizona. conveniently built on an indian reservation against the wishes of the tribal council, who wanted nothing to do with the government’s white supremacist bullshit. why only infringe on the rights and wishes of one minority group, right?
  • choice quote:   ”After fifteen months at Arizona’s vast Poston Relocation Center as a social analyst, Commander Leighton concluded that many an American simply fails to remember that U.S. Japanese are human beings.”
  • shortly after arriving, all prisoners were asked to fill out a survey. most of the questions would be simple, like their name, city of birth, etc, but questions 27 and 28 were different.
  • question 27:  Are you willing to serve in the armed forces of the United States on combat duty, wherever ordered?
  • question 28:  Will you swear unqualified allegiance to the United States of America and faithfully defend the United States from any and all attacks by foreign and domestic forces, and forswear any form of allegiance or disobedience to the Japanese Emperor, or any other foreign government, power, or organization?
  • did you answer yes to both? congratulations! you’re a soldier. did you answer no to both? perhaps you’re too old or sick to serve? perhaps the general fuckery of this entire situation got you down? perhaps you were born outside of the us, so you can’t disavow your country of origin since there is a very real chance you’ll be deported? haha well congratulations hope you like prison and/or deportation
  • so all of this goes on
  • and then morita goes on to serve
  • and get captured
  • and rescued
  • and dumbass doogan says, “what, are we taking everybody?”
  • fuck you
  • i’m from fresno

IMPORTANT SO IMPORTANT.

I don’t know if Morita is canonically from the 442nd Infantry Regiment or not, but I wouldn’t be surprised if he was (although I’m not sure if the dates match up); the 442nd was an almost entirely Japanese-American infantry regiment that was the most decorated American unit in ALL OF AMERICAN HISTORY because the members had so much to prove.  And they did this all while their families were in interment camps back in the States.  They served in the European theatre of war because the American government was afraid to send Japanese-American soldiers to the Pacific theatre because the U.S. government was full of racist jackasses during WWII.

This is my favorite line from the movie. (Possibly because of all the times I’ve been asked “Where are you from?” and answered “California”.)

I first heard of the 442nd Regiment from my dad, and I still get deeply, dorkishly excited every time I see them mentioned. Their motto was “Go for Broke”, and they were nicknamed the Purple Heart Battalion because of their record-setting medal count. A choice bit from wikipedia (emphasis mine):

On 12 November, General Dahlquist ordered the entire 442nd to stand in formation for a ceremony, and seeing K company’s 18 men and I company’s eight, demanded of Colonel Miller, “I want all your men to stand for this formation.” Miller responded, “That’s all of K company left, sir” (of 400, originally).

So where is THAT movie?

Yeah, the dates for Morita to be part of the 442nd don’t match up, and they don’t match up for the 100th Infantry Battalion, either, which was the other primarily US-born Nisei unit active in the European theater and had an even more dramatic formation history than the 442nd. Alternatively, the promo film that you see with Cap has, IIRC, a bit where he pretend-walks off to war with a black soldier behind him with a gun, so maybe we can make a case that in MCU, Executive Order 9981 was pre-WWII?  

My fave possibility is probably the idea that Morita was in the Military Intelligence Service, Operations Group. I don’t know how he ended up in the European theater if that happened, but GODDAMMIT I LIKE IT. And I like to think that post-Commandos, he went back to the MIS, but when Peggy got the gang together again, he left to join SHIELD because he wanted no fucking part of an organization that was involved in covering up rape and looting by US and Allied troops in occupied Japan.  

And because it deserves all the publicity, a movie did get made in 2006, and it was called Only the Brave.

justatinysootsprite:

What, are we taking everybody?

the reason that this line is significant is because jim morita was a japanese-american soldier. while it’s never explicitly stated, here’s what morita’s life would have been like before being captured by HYDRA:

  • december 7, 1942:  the empire of japan attacked pearl harbor. he was probably a soldier at this time since he was considered to be elite enough for steve’s squad; unknown where he served, although there were many japanese-american soldiers who died in and who were the first responders to the attack.
  • december 8, 1942:  the us declares a state of war with japan.
  • all japanese-american men disqualified from the draft via the label “4-C,” or “enemy alien,” no matter their citizenry. all japanese-american men in the service are removed from duty.
  • february 19, 1942:  president roosevelt signed executive order 9066, authorizing the military to exclude certain groups from military zones.
  • the fbi searched the homes of japanese-americans for “contraband,” including correspondence with anyone in japan such as personal letters. any such contraband is confiscated.
  • (fun sidenote:  how did they know where to find these people so that they could be harassed? well, gosh, the census bureau told them. illegally. no big deal.)
  • community leaders, including priests, gathered up and sent to prison camps like tule lake. this is also where several families were sent to be deported to japan since they were not deemed loyal enough.
  • 122,000 people of japanese-american descent are told to sell or store their property as they can only bring what they can carry out of the “exclusion zones,” which meant most of the west coast. (hawaii, whose population was about a quarter japanese, was for the most part not included in this.) given only a few weeks to organize their lives, they were then sent via cattle train to concentration camps set up throughout the us.
  • since morita was from fresno, he would have ended up here:
    charming.
  • sunny poston, arizona. conveniently built on an indian reservation against the wishes of the tribal council, who wanted nothing to do with the government’s white supremacist bullshit. why only infringe on the rights and wishes of one minority group, right?
  • choice quote:   ”After fifteen months at Arizona’s vast Poston Relocation Center as a social analyst, Commander Leighton concluded that many an American simply fails to remember that U.S. Japanese are human beings.”
  • shortly after arriving, all prisoners were asked to fill out a survey. most of the questions would be simple, like their name, city of birth, etc, but questions 27 and 28 were different.
  • question 27:  Are you willing to serve in the armed forces of the United States on combat duty, wherever ordered?
  • question 28:  Will you swear unqualified allegiance to the United States of America and faithfully defend the United States from any and all attacks by foreign and domestic forces, and forswear any form of allegiance or disobedience to the Japanese Emperor, or any other foreign government, power, or organization?
  • did you answer yes to both? congratulations! you’re a soldier. did you answer no to both? perhaps you’re too old or sick to serve? perhaps the general fuckery of this entire situation got you down? perhaps you were born outside of the us, so you can’t disavow your country of origin since there is a very real chance you’ll be deported? haha well congratulations hope you like prison and/or deportation
  • so all of this goes on
  • and then morita goes on to serve
  • and get captured
  • and rescued
  • and dumbass doogan says, “what, are we taking everybody?”
  • fuck you
  • i’m from fresno
Tagged with: #Captain America  
absentlyabbie:

shinykari:

legete:

haipollai:

ok, idk how easy this is to read but since everyone is discussing dates, i went to the movie to check. this is steve’s rejection from the beginning, his birthday is in the upper right corner and there’s ANOTHEr date in the lower left which I think is supposed to be a today’s date kind of thing and it looks to be June 14 1943
so there we go, steve enlists in mid 1943

#this feels late for bucky to be enlisting #but that isn’t the issue
How interesting that you would mention this, because I’ve recently been thinking he didn’t enlist. His serial number, which he’s heard muttering when Steve comes to rescue him, starts “32557.”
According to this fabulous WWII serial number generator, an enlisted man from New York should have a serial number starting with the numbers “12.”
A New York man with a serial number starting with “32”? Drafted. What we may be dealing with here is a Bucky who didn’t choose to go to war but was instead compelled to do so versus a Steve who is desperate to get in. I think it opens up a lot of different and interesting storylines for the two of them.

There’s been some great meta/discussion about this in the last couple days, which I think is great.

Makes you wonder if Bucky got the draft, and then, knowing how Steve felt about things, told his best buddy he was “enlisting.” Because how do you face this skinny, brave idiot who just won’t stop trying to volunteer that you wouldn’t be going if you didn’t have to?

absentlyabbie:

shinykari:

legete:

haipollai:

ok, idk how easy this is to read but since everyone is discussing dates, i went to the movie to check. this is steve’s rejection from the beginning, his birthday is in the upper right corner and there’s ANOTHEr date in the lower left which I think is supposed to be a today’s date kind of thing and it looks to be June 14 1943

so there we go, steve enlists in mid 1943

#this feels late for bucky to be enlisting #but that isn’t the issue

How interesting that you would mention this, because I’ve recently been thinking he didn’t enlist. His serial number, which he’s heard muttering when Steve comes to rescue him, starts “32557.”

According to this fabulous WWII serial number generator, an enlisted man from New York should have a serial number starting with the numbers “12.”

A New York man with a serial number starting with “32”? Drafted. What we may be dealing with here is a Bucky who didn’t choose to go to war but was instead compelled to do so versus a Steve who is desperate to get in. I think it opens up a lot of different and interesting storylines for the two of them.

There’s been some great meta/discussion about this in the last couple days, which I think is great.

Makes you wonder if Bucky got the draft, and then, knowing how Steve felt about things, told his best buddy he was “enlisting.” Because how do you face this skinny, brave idiot who just won’t stop trying to volunteer that you wouldn’t be going if you didn’t have to?

Tagged with: #sobbing  #captain america  #Steve Rogers  

ssfrostiron:

 Agent Coulson is down

#gif warning #avengers #okay but why does nOBODY EVER TALK ABOUT THE GENERATION GAP #come on guys this is the MOST INTERESTING THING #look if steve had lived through the war he would have been part of that post-wwii generation #imagine steve in the 60S GUYS #you think he would have put up with those young folks disrespecting those soldiers and his country by protesting the war? HECK NO #remember that scene at the beginning of ca:tfa where he tells off that guy in the movie theater? THAT WOULD BE STEVE IN THE 60S #and tony is in his 40s!! tony is gen x! tony is NOT EVEN A BOOMER #tony is TOO YOUNG TO BE A BABY BOOMER tony is YOUNGER THAN OUR PARENTS #tony doesn’t know what it’s like to live in a country that’s in total war! tony doesn’t know what it’s like for loyalty to your country t… #to be something that almost everyone has! #look guys we make fun of america ALL THE TIME we mock patriotism and nationalism and the usa CON STANT LY #when steve hears the word soldier he equates it with the word hero #and when tony hears the word soldier he hears an insult. #because steve’s war is wwii #and tony’s wars are vietnam and iraq and afghanistan and tony knows that when america fights wars it is not necessarily the good guy! #and steve cannot even BEGIN to comprehend that #steve barely knows what WATERGATE is for god’s sake steve probably still trusts the government #steve doesn’t know about jfk conspiracy theories! steve doesn’t know about the patriot act #(and let me remind you that in 616 canon steve actually fought a war to bring down the expy!patriot act) #god america has grown up SO MUCH since steve’s day #americans are sarcastic and cynical and plugged into the media 24/7 #americans depricate themselves constantly americans hate america more than anybody else does #pearl harbor turned america into a unified force for change in the world; 9/11 turned america into something paranoid and bitter #steve no longer represents america #he represents what america wishes it had ever been #and tony? tony understands the usa a whole lot better than steve does and he knows it and steve never will #and tony understands how war can destroy and steve only understands how it can save #holy christ why would you write porn when you could write about that